Throwing it back to the beginning

One comment

Camden William (after Craig’s Dad) MacMillan was born on June 6th 2014. His birth story is far from a ‘typical’ delivery but not anything that had us worried right from the get go…at least not when this was our first ‘rodeo’. I will get more into the complications during pregnancy and delivery on a follow up post. Camden was small (5lbs. 11oz.) when he was born, he didn’t have much interest in eating but that didn’t seem to be a huge concern in the hospital. He lost weight and was kept one extra day but other than that everything looked good and we were headed home. 

I noticed that he was spitting up a lot and I mentioned this to his Pediatrician on several occasions; I was concerned about reflux. The response I received was ‘every Mom thinks their baby has reflux’. Insert mad face here. I just knew something wasn’t right. They finally agreed to refer us out to a GI specialist at St. John’s. I’ll never forget this visit. The Dr. had completed his physical exam and stepped out of the room to get new formula samples. As a side note, Camden had to be supplemented with formula from the get go because he wasn’t eating and was losing weight. Upon the Dr.’s return Camden proceeded to projectile vomit across the room and all over my Mom like it was on cue. The Dr. immediately ordered a swallow study, which ultimately came back as inconclusive.


Back to the Pediatrician; after not feeling heard, we made a decision to switch to a new Dr.,  Dr. Spangler at IHA in Plymouth was where we landed when my Mom called several times after being told they weren’t accepting new patients. If you know my Mom you know she can sweet talk her way into almost anything…persistence does pay off. The first thing Dr. Spangler said when she picked him up was that he felt a little ‘floppy’. She referred us as a precaution to both a Neurologist at U of M and Early On (a public school funded service for delayed kiddos). Michigan Early On


You all may be thinking that we were panicked at this point but the truth is, we were not. Had this been our second child I think our heads would have been headed in a different direction than they were. In hindsight, especially after experiencing the newborn phase with Crew (our second child), there were clues that this was not a typical newborn experience; but we were none the wiser.

The Pediatric Neurology office called us to set up an appointment and to let us know that there had been a blood test ordered. My Mom and I went out to St. Joe’s to have his blood drawn which was a trying experience. Watching your 3 month old baby have their blood taken was traumatizing but the projectile vomiting in the waiting room made it that much more eventful. Come to find out the blood draw was to get Camden’s CK levels, which was to rule out muscular dystrophy. 


Still not knowing the wiser we were still in a very good place with all of this. Too naïve? Perhaps. Overwhelmed with parenthood? Maybe. Just a sense that everything was going to be ok? Yes! And ok it has been. More than ok actually. Every milestone Camden meets is that much more exciting because we know he has worked so much harder that a ‘typical child’ to achieve them. He has taught us a love like nothing else. He has taught us to be more compassionate, loving, to live in the moment, and to be more conscience that everyone is fighting a battle and to slow the heck down.

You are probably wondering how the neurology and early on appointments went, I will save that for the next post. We had to wait 4 months to get into the Neurologist, but I will fill you in on the blood work…it came back at normal levels.

Until next time –

3 C’s and a K

 

1 comments on “Throwing it back to the beginning”

  1. “He has taught us a love like nothing else. He has taught us to be more compassionate, loving, to live in the moment, and to be more conscience that everyone is fighting a battle and to slow the heck down.” It’s such a revelation to learn that “everyone is fighting a battle”, isn’t it? It’s somehow freeing I think. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s